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10/Apr/2024

On Wednesday 3rd April, Dr+Vet was honoured to welcome leading veterinary ophthalmologist Maria Simó for our first webinar on Keratoconjunctivitis Seca (KCS) in dogs. During this virtual event, María Simó shared her knowledge and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of this common but often underestimated eye disease. Today, we can finally announce that the full video, with subtitles in English (and other languages automatically), is available for viewing on our blog and our YouTube channel! Attached to this article, you will find the direct link to the video so you can access it and deepen the knowledge shared by María Simó.

About Maria Simó:

Maria Simó is a renowned veterinary ophthalmologist with a solid background and extensive experience in the field of veterinary ophthalmology. Graduated in Veterinary Medicine from the Autonomous University of Barcelona, María has completed several postgraduate courses and works as an ophthalmologist at the prestigious Instituto Veterinario Oftalmológico (IVO) in Barcelona.

Contenido del Webinar:

Maria Simó talked us through the basics of Keratoconjunctivitis Seca, from diagnostic methods to the most effective treatment options, exploring in detail how to approach this disease in a comprehensive way.

One of the main conclusions of the webinar was the importance of not relying solely on the Schirmer test to diagnose KCS. María Simó emphasised the need for a complete and detailed assessment, as well as the use of additional diagnostic tools for a correct diagnosis, as without all the information, ineffective treatments may be prescribed. She also talked about the importance of referring cases that do not resolve correctly in order to fully evaluate them.

 

We thank all participants for their support.

The webinar on Keratoconjunctivitis Seca with Maria Simó was a great success, and we would like to thank everyone who joined us for this educational event. We hope that this resource will be a valuable source of information for all veterinarians interested in veterinary ophthalmology. Feel free to check out the full video and share it with your colleagues.

Stay tuned to our social media and website for more information on future of Dr+Vet events and educational resources!


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10/Apr/2024

Dr+Vet presents its new Guide to the Diagnosis and Management of Keratoconjunctivitis Seca in Companion Pets

We are pleased to announce the launch of our latest initiative: the Guide to the Diagnosis and Management of Keratoconjunctivitis Seca (KCS) in Companion Animals. This guide has been designed to provide veterinarians with a tool to address this common ocular pathology in pets.

KCS, also known as dry eye, is a disease that affects the ocular health of animals, causing discomfort and, in severe cases, permanent damage to the cornea and conjunctiva. To help veterinary professionals diagnose and treat this condition effectively, our guide covers a wide range of topics, from the pathophysiology of the disease to treatment options and recommendations for clinical management.

Some of the guide’s topics include:

  • A detailed description of the disease and its impact on the ocular health of animals.
  • Explanation of the different types of KCS and their clinical features.
  • Diagnostic methods.
  • Treatment options, from artificial tears to more advanced therapies.

At Dr+Vet, we want to assist in everyday clinical practice by providing valuable resources to help veterinarians provide the best possible care for their furry patients.

The Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca Diagnosis and Management Guide is now available for free download on our website – don’t miss this opportunity to improve your knowledge and skills in managing your patients’ ocular health!

Click here to download: Dr+Vet. Guide for KCS for veterinarians


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25/Mar/2024

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), also known as “dry eye,” is a common ophthalmic condition in dogs and cats that affects the ocular surface, specifically the cornea and conjunctiva.

This disease results from the deficiency of some of the phases of the tear film, which leads to tear hyperosmolarity and, consequently, a series of ocular complications that can compromise the visual health of the animal.

The structure of the tear

To better understand KCS, it is important to know the three layers that make up the tear film and their functions:

  • Mucinous layer: This layer, the innermost, modifies the surface tension of the tear so that it adheres and distributes properly over the surface of the eye. Mucin is produced and secreted mainly in conjunctival goblet cells.
  • Aqueous layer: The intermediate layer, and the most abundant, hydrates the ocular surface and transports nutrients and oxygen essential for the metabolism of the cornea. It also acts as a flushing mechanism to remove debris and foreign bodies. This watery portion is produced and secreted in the main and accessory lacrimal glands.
  • Lipid layer: The outermost layer protects the aqueous layer from evaporation, allowing the tear to remain in the eye longer. In addition, it increases the surface tension of the tear, preventing overflow over the edge of the eyelid and lubricating the eyelids. This layer is produced and secreted mainly in the meibomian glands.

KCS classification

The KCS can be classified into two main types:

  • Qualitative KCS: It is produced by a pathological decrease in the lipid or mucoid components of the tear film, which makes it difficult for it to remain on the cornea, either due to excess evaporation or difficulty adhering. It is usually due to damage or inflammation in the meibomian glands or goblet cells of the conjunctiva.
  • Quantitative KCS: It is produced by a pathological decrease in the aqueous component of the tear film. It can have various causes, the most common being localized and chronic immune-mediated inflammation of the lacrimal gland. This is the most common form of KCS, and in most cases it progresses to a mixed form (quantitative and qualitative) over time.

What symptoms does it cause?

Symptoms of KCS may include mucosal exudate, conjunctival hyperemia, corneal opacity, neovascularization, corneal edema, and ulceration, among others. The diagnosis of KCS requires a thorough evaluation of the patient’s medical history and specific ophthalmological tests, such as the Schirmer Test, Fluorescein Test, and the Lysamine Green Test.

What treatment is used?

Treatment of KCS may include artificial tears, topical immunosuppressants, and surgical treatments, depending on the severity and underlying cause of the disease. Additionally, supplementation with specific nutraceuticals such as LACRIMALIS+ can help manage this disease, offering natural help to maintain pets’ eye health.

 

If your pet presents symptoms compatible with this disease, go to your trusted veterinarian for correct diagnosis and treatment.


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